Skip to main content

About your Search

20130216
20130224
STATION
FBC 14
FOXNEWS 13
CSPAN 12
CSPAN2 8
CNN 7
CNNW 7
MSNBCW 7
MSNBC 6
KQED (PBS) 5
CNBC 4
KRCB (PBS) 3
WMPT (PBS) 3
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 2
LINKTV 2
WETA 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 115
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 115 (some duplicates have been removed)
. they are studying the evolution of specialization as they uncover details of ancient economies around the world. in the maya city of copan, a jeweler fashioned rare shell and jade for his powerful lord. in mexico, living artisans echo the economy of a vanished civilization. and in teotihuacan, evidence of mass production has now been unearthed. tiny faces of clay reflect the men and women who made them a thousand years ago. on the other side of the world, in the ancient roman city of ostia, huge merchant ships were part of an economy much like our own. and today, the tanners of morocco still practice their ancient craft, living proof that economies have evolved out of the past. everyone who has ever lived has been part of an economic system. iel bote grande...mil pesos! economic systems are simply the ways people produce, distribute and consume things -- everything and anything, from tortillas to stocks and bonds. for 10,000, 10,000 an eighth. today, as in the past, economic systems lie at the heart of how a society is organized. archaeologists search for these systems because they believe econ
drones flying over the united states. higher gasoline prices, higher taxes, weakening the economy and taxes, weakening the economy and harris on what the future holds. at a dry cleaner, taxes, weakening the economy and harris on what the future holds. we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. we all work remotely so this is a big deal, our first full team gathering! i wanted to call on a few people. ashley, ashley marshall... here. since we're often all on the move, ashley suggested we use fedex office to hold packages for us. great job. [ applause ] thank you. and on a protocol note, i'd like to talk to tim hill about his tendency to u all caps in emails. [ shouting ] oh i'm sorry guys. ah sometimes the caps lock gets stuck on my keyboard. hey do you wanna get a drink later? [ male announcer ] hold packages at any fedex office location. hey do you wanna get a drink later? progressive direct and other
to the economy. >> is this short -- >> it will ultimately work out if the economy can get by with the back to normal payroll tax. this could juice it back around. there's no perfect plan the government can do, but it's possible this payroll tax cut could be lowered in the recession and raisedded in boom times to make up for the cut. lou: good evening, evrybody the day can be described as quiet from washington to the middle east, where as two days for market selloffs brought i told you sos from some wall street gurus. today's triple digit rally in the dow was unobserved by those who lost the narrative. as surrogates and private campaign force, organizing for action, worked to upend the second amendment, the president, himself, seems most willing to put a electoral risk, and the democratic senators and they had the elections, and facing constituents on gun control, trying to explain the president's early enthusiasms and why he's silent about it now. the president privately meeting with white house reporters today who took with it, pins, cameras, or anything with which to record the president
the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next, on booktv. this is a little over an hour.ro ba okay. it is great tock be back at the society. >> for 25 years now, we enjoy a terrific relationship with the a japan society in so manyys wayse ved quudible] bed we have lived quite a bit o time in this is great to be with you let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when
diplomat william rhodes talks about the current economic and financial charges facing the economies of europe, japan, china and south korea. next on booktv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it's great to be back at the japan society, and we enjoy our relationship that way. tokyo, for the mcgraw-hill companies, has been the headquarters of our asia pacific operations for 25 years now, and we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot concern in a lot of different ways. one of many by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to m
leader but brazil is one of the most important emerging economies for the whole global economy it's one of as we call them the bricks the emerging economies that has the chance to structure how the economy is going to look going forward. when you think about the countries but obviously the united states when you think about the countries along the pacific rim of latin america they make connect more to the economy of asia. i was always struck when i would go to something called the summit of the americas which is about latin america and the caribbean and we would have these discussions and travis would take off and everybody would sort of what ever. but then almost a week or two weeks later we would go to the asia pacific economic council. there it is the pacific rim countries of chellie and the pacific rim all the way to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea and the conversation was completely different. was about global trade and freeing trade. and i actually always thought that in that sense the country had more in common with their asian counterparts than their
and central bankers from the world's biggest economies meet to debate spending cuts versus growth. we look at international investing and pockets of strength around the globe. and, hedge fund manager carl icahn ups his stake in herbalife, calling the vitamin maker a legit business. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance ministers and central bankers are meeting in moscow over the weekend. they will be debating the need for austerity, versus the need to spur growth. no one expects a quick turnaround for the european economy, which has been mired in recession. but as erika miller reports, that may make now a good time to invest. >> reporter: it would makes sense that american investors would be loading up on u.s. stocks with the market here doing so well. but they're not. last week, investors in stock mutual funds put virtually all their cash in international markets. more than $3 billion went into funds holding international stoc
on republicans warning that our economy, jobs, lives, could be in danger, if these scheduled cuts across the board go through. but the latest numbers show if the automatic reductions take place, there will be 85 billion dollars in cuts this year. that's equal to what the government spends in nine days. even if it happens, the government is projected more than last year, so he you see, we're talking about a decrease in the increase in spending and you may be asking yourself how can we survive and live on, with just the paltry amount of spending? well, where would we look for the example? how about last year when we did it just fine? all this leading to questions about how the fallout could be so dramatic. so dire, so awful. when the total federal budget is actually increasing. chris stirewalt is our national digital news editor. how can we do it? where can we find the historical example of the surviving on a budget that's cut in this manner. oh, last year. i mean, what's the answer to that. why are the politicians, you know, chicken littling us? >> well, remember this, if there , if there
is starting to return. >> reporter: sure, the u.s. economy may be outperforming most other developed nations. but some investment strategists see good opportunities in the weakest parts the world like europe. >> although growth is still negative, we do believe that this year will be that tipping point where growth returns positive. and things are getting progressively just a little less bad. >> reporter: he recommends buying the stocks of big european companies that get much of their revenues outside the region. >> you've got a lot of companies based in these countries which sell to the emerging markets and that growing consumer within the emerging markets. i think you're seeing a lot of >> reporter: but others have a country specific approach. wells fargo advisors has norway as a top pick. >> not only is it a country with relatively low debt and a good credit standing, but it's also a country that's the 15th largest oil exporter in the world. and we think oil prices will continue to edge higher here. >> reporter: but, remember, even if you just buy stocks of big american companies, you like
the sequestered because it is a wholly unnecessary will run the economy if it were to take place. >> except there were others in the president's party like former democratic national committee chairman howard dean suggesting the president should let the sequester happen to slice the pentagon's budget. telling the huffington post, i am in favor of the sequestered. it is tough on things that i care about a lot, but the fact of the matter is, you are not going to get another chance to cut the defense budget in the way that it needs to be cut. white house officials disagree. as does the outgoing defense secretary leon panetta warned such deep cuts could leave america with as second-rate military. lou: you will remember republicans were furious before the election and the white house was not complying with the warrant act which is a law that basically says employers need to warn employees about upcoming furloughs. the white house pushed back on all of that. now they are releasing those for loan notices. remember, people the 30-60 days in some cases on notices, which means these furloughs will ta
accusing each other of letting down the country and letting down the economy during the debate in parliament behind me. >> mean while there were confrontations between protesters and demonstrators in greece. demonstrators are demanding a halt to planned spending cuts and tax hikes. one-third of the 11 million people in greece are unemployed. an associate of -- of a singapore businessman expected of being part of a global match fixing scandal has been arrested in italy. the interval investigation, conducted with the health of -- help of fifa, authorities were tipped off by italian officials. >> delegates have been here for the last few days, discussing how endemic the problem of match fixing is a cross football. they have acknowledged max fixing, a multimillion-dollar business, could be killing the game. >> what we saw in the past was just a little. also, international friendly. i heard from the euro whole press conference -- euro pulled -- euro pol press conference that as of now there is no indication that the organization has been infiltrated. >> the secretary general has den
a gallon. in arlington prices are not nearly that high. >> they should be going down, right? the economy is hurting right now. we cannot afford this. >> a lot of us are frustrated. aaa says the average price for regular stands at $3.74 a gallon. it is a little cheaper in virginia at $3.61. economies. the economists worry along surge in prices could hurt the economy. >> i feel like there is every excuse in the world for gas prices to go up. but one reason for the recent tax hike -- price type might be because of opec. production was cut by about 1 million barrels a day. partly in response to rising oil production and parts of the world, including the united states. >> developments in the investigation on to the carnival cruise ship disaster. the full investigation is expected to take six months. more than 4000 passengers through stranded on that ship for five days in the gulf of mexico after the triumph of power. >> a lawsuit against the university of maryland by the acc appears to be moving forward. a judge has denied a request to have a lawsuit dismissed. it was to force the university
economy on an irreversible, downward path. we will hear about the past consequences of the impending cuts. i do not doubt that they will be painful to bear. if there is a way to mitigate the pain,i'm open to discussion. i believe it is important to emphasize that the sequester of whatever temporary solution we have made is just a precursor to the main event. thank you. >> thank you, senator shelby. we will go to the panel. i am going to explain how this is going to work. we would have begin with omb and wrap up with national security. in the interest of time and efficacy, we will have one panel and be able to ask questions where we can get cross communication going. we will start with you and then secretary donovan and secretary napolitano. we will go to questions and alternating on both sides of the aisle. right off with senator shelby and myself. you are representing omb. their obligations with the presidential responsibility. go ahead and give us the details of omb. i will not introduce everyone. we will keep it going. >> thank you. members of the committee, good morning. i'm here to d
a question on everyone's mind -- how do we get the economy to grow from here? no one knows better than the leaders of corporate america. joining on set this morning, 32 adviser ceo robert wolfe. we'll have hanes celestial ceo irwin simon. and the kraft group president, jonathan kraft. >>> on the lighter side of things, spring is around the corner. that must meantime for baseball. white sox vice president ken williams will join us to talk business on and off the diamond coming up at 8:40 eastern time. >>> an interesting mix of topics in rotation today. first, let's get over to andrew with the top headlines. >> thanks. >>> boeing reportedly found a way to fix battery problems with its grounded 787. here's what's happening. involves increasing the space between cells in the battery. a source tells reuters the gaps between the cells were why there was overheating. we'll talk about that in a bit. >>> in other news on boeing, the company's engineers are split on a contract. the largest professional group approved the planemaker's latest contract offer. but members of a smaller technical unio
people to make more than $9 an hour. you create a robust economy. >> bill: what is the biggest problem facing america? two new analysts scott brown and herman cain will tell us and i will weigh in on that. >> i'm a clinton person. that is the way politics is. >> bill: how does president obama stack up against president clinton? >> he needs to go into the room >> bill: here come the lawsuits against carnival cruise operation. he millions of dollars will be sought with the ship falling apart on the high seas. is it legal? >> caution you are about to enter the no-spin zone. factor begins right now. ♪ ♪ >> bill: i'm bill o'reilly, thanks for watching tonight. what is the biggest problem facing the country today? that is the subject of this evening's talking points. on paper the biggest problem is the national debt approaching $70 trillion with no end in sight and failure of pinheads to deal with the debt in washington. if the massive borrowing continues the u.s. economy could very well collapse, but in reality, no on the paper, the biggest problem the nation has is us, our mentality. i
at the pump for the last month. joining us in the next hour, oil man boone pickens. so the economy is at the top of the hour. andrew will get you up to speed on the day's other headlines. >> hedge fund manager david einhorn is taking his apple campaign directly to shareholders. he's going to be hosting a conference call today to argue the merits of distributing hedging preferred stock which, of course, is what this big debate is about. einhorn is battling and seeking an injunction next week to abolish a system for issuing preferred stock. i got a letter overnight from the nation's foundation which has a stake in apple and they are pushing back against david einhorn, something we should probably talk about a little later. >> we will. >> also in the news this morning, boeing is expected to meet with the faa tomorrow and launch a formal plan to get its grounded 787 back into service. the company will be proposing a resign of the dreamliner's batteries. officials say the jets could be back in the air within two months. >>> finally, appear highser bush, inbev want a court to grant a sho
that then goes out and stimulate the world economy like apollo and early space programs stimulated the economy of the world. i got an iphone on my hip that has 2000 times the memory of an apollo computer. can you imagine? the space station guys, they have texts, skype or something up there. and they're all on their laptops. it boggles your mind what is going on there technologically. >> today you could probably tweet what is going on on your flight. on your first and only flight, on the way back to earth, you got to do spacewalk. >> it was totally different. a different experience. as i described being on the moon, it contrasts the gray lunar surface with the blackness of space. people ask me what does the earth like from the moon? i said i cannot tell you because i landed in the center of the moon which took the earth directly overhead. in an apollo space suit, it is like being in a fishbowl. you move your head but the helmut does not move. so i did not get to see the earth very much from the moon. but in lunar orbit, you come around from the backside and there is the earth rise. we landed at
-- and going to remain dysfunctional and that the economy is weak. gerri: a long way to go. i thinkou're absolutely right. those memories are still fresh of losing half of your retirement savings. you don't forget that in a heartbeat. they come up with reasons for delaying retirement. 58 percent said don't have enough savings. outstanding debt and market stability in housing values. and interesting because so much of regular american wealth is tied up in their house. that took a major hit. >> absolutely. gerri: and so when you look at market stability going forward, there seems to be no real place in the stock market that will continue rising even though we have seen a great run. what is amazing is the number of individual investors stayed at of the market despite the fact that we keep seesawing back and forth over the 14,000 level on the dow. >> well, you know, investors have been burned, but nothing the other thing, the reason my retirees are fearful is that interest rates are so low. takes two and a half times more money to generate the same amount of income as it did ten years ago
that nobody expected to actually go into effect, it's bad management for the macro economy, for large programs, of course, but that said and the recent notes of the market freaking out, it is not doomsday. we have a tendency in washington of wildly overhyping everything we do. this is not like the debt ceiling or even the fiscal cliff. this is not doomsday even if it does happen. it's just stupid and we shouldn't do it. >> ezra, a couple of things here. first of all, for a long time, the stock market and the economy, as from the perspective of working people, have been at least two different things, correct? one thing, you can see the stock market doing fine. that might have a lot more to do with china than what is to happen march 1st. secondly, let's say nothing happens. the unemployment rate is stuck around 8%. this is a pretty lousy time for nothing to happen. in fact, if you look at the cbo projections, the projection with the sequester taking effect is for the unemployment rate to be 7.9% the first half of this year, 8% for the second half of this year. so, basically stuck at a place that
ministers tell japan and other big missions, no currency wars. if a weaker currency helps their economy, plummet against the dollar and the euro. where's the trade for you? top currency strategist helps you dig for the treasure. are your mutual funds socking you in dividend taxes? a morningstar analyst teaches you how to -- >> countdown starts right now. liz: good afternoon everybody. i'm liz claman. happy president's day. yes, the u.s. markets are closed, but we are open for business. and good thing at that, breaking news in just the last hour and a half, the "wall street journal" reporting that office max and office depot are in talks to merge. sources say the talks are fluid, could still fall apart, but an announcement could come as early as this week. office depot is the bigger of the two with a market value of about 1.3 billion dollars. while office max, about 933 million dollars. both have pretty much skyrocketed over the second half of last year. now, according to sources, the deal is expected to be stock for stock exchange. the possible merger could help the two office supply re
to market, but we also have to make our economy more efficient and use less oil. >> that was president obama in an interview yesterday answering a question about rising gas prices. his response illustrates a balancing act he faces on manager issues. moving towards energy independence and also addressing climate change concerns. nothing tests that balancing act more than the decision on the keystone xl pipeline. an approval the president delayed last year due to concerns over the pipeline ae environmental impact. the keystone is back on the table. the $7 billion project would build a 2,000 mile pipeline connecting canada's oil sands to refineries in texas and the gulf of mexico delivering more than 700,000 barrels of heavy crude oil into the country every day. president obama and the state department are expected to make a decision by the end of march, but it won't be easy. last weekend tens of thousands of environmentalists took to the streets of washington in what's being billed as the largest climate rally in u.s. history. opponents of the pipeline say that the extraction of the crude oil
to do is keep on making our overall economy use less oil. >> neil: but what is all this about how much energy we're using, but not how much energy we're getting? because we're not getting as much as we can. the oil watch, on what is really behind the pain at the pump. what is it? >> certainly not consumption. that statement from president obama is ridiculous. if you look at u.s. oil consumption, it's been declining for a long time now. last year we consumed 18.6 million barrels of oil a day, which i the same amount we consumed in 1996. so u.s. oil consumption is going down. not about the u.s. consuming more oil. western european oil consumption is going down. i you want to know where the growth is coming. , it's emerging marks like champion and india. china consumes two barrels of oil per person per year compared to the u.s. at 22 and at it just going to keep going -- >> it's not how much we're using but access to how much we're getting? the president says he has been more open to opening up land than anyone prior. you say what? >> well, i don't think so. obviously the u.s. energy comp
our overall economy use less oil. and we've got fewer oil imports now than we have in a very long time, but there's more work to do and unfortunately because of worldwide demand, oil prices are going to keep on going up and down until we put in place some of the energy saving proposals that i have talked about during the the state of the union. stuart: all right, a fairly simple answer from the president and energy policies, follow my policies and all will be well. remember, the price is doubled on his watch and billions wasted on green energy, little impact. we've got more on that coming up on the show. here is what we've got now, across the board cuts go through maybe march 1st will we therefore sell off on the stock market. that's on the opening bell next. it's a new day. if your a man with low testostero, you should know that axiron is here. the only underarm treatment for low t. that's right, the one you apply to the underarm. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axironan transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may bec
there are more significant. we need a transition to -- there are major economies going and the direction of low carbon. we are pushing the us to go in that direction. there is opportunity for canada to diversify its economy and become low carbon. and europe, they're looking at a directive. there is an opportunity i think to view the developments. is this a momentous change that we are looking at to start driving this? what does that mean for that relationship? i think the economic growth and the job opportunities are much bigger and greater than where we would find the fossil fuels sector. >> rupert murdoch, the guy who owns fox news and the wall street journal, he tweeted against of a keystone and said that we do not need. we have cleaner, natural gas from phrack inc.. -- fracking. what is the implication of this domestic boom? what crowd out the need for energy from canada? what does it mean that the u.s. is talking about being energy independent? >> it was separated into two areas. natural gas and homes. we are looking at surpluses. to say whether it will crowd canadian gas out of the u.s. m
people have been coming from mexico. and part of that is the bad economy in the u.s. there's just fewer jobs. part of that is a good economy in mexico. part of it's our enforcement. and of course, drug cartels and the drug war in mexico have played a huge role. >> but james, republicans are going to have to talk about border security, border security, border security to sell the other part of this. we saw john mccain and jeff flake, the two senators from arizona, having to sort of go back and forth and back and forth and slowly move their constituents along. and the way they do that is by talking tough on the border. >> yes. and this is politics playing out. right after the election, even sean hannity said well, maybe i'm for some kind of a border thing. the people in the republican party voting in these republican primaries, they're not sold on this. and i think senator mccain found that when he went back to arizona. it's going to happen time and time again. and they do have to bring them along. >> it's going to be tough in louisiana, too, isn't it? >> very. >> mary landrieu. is mary,
get breaks. homosexual couples do not. it costs the economy because money that's going into extra taxes, into these other expenses could be going into the economy to benefit everybody. >> suze, i know you did a special on this on cnbc last summer, and kind of big head scratcher out of this was that gay and lesbian couples pay more in this country to be treated unequally. >> so does that make any sense? it doesn't make any sense anymore. listen, we are 2013, and the time has come now that doma is ended, that everybody is treated equal. there should be no financial inequalities anywhere. there should be no emotional inequalities. as the governor will tell you, he not only considers this a civil rights issue, but it also is a financial issue as well. this is the time now starting in march when we're going to hear these arguments starting in the supreme court that hopefully we can get everybody on board to understand that everybody financially in my opinion is getting hurt by this. not just gay couples. >> governor, i want to give you the last word, and you talked about how the econom
change that perception. let's focus on a reality. by reality i mean economy of our political system. this correction has its own economy. the economy as two components. one is an economy of stop, and the other is the economy of extortion. the economy of stop drives us to point to andho instability in our government. any system where the tiniest slice of the public dominates in the funding produces a system where a tiny number of americans can effectively block any change. it will always be that or at least almost always be that in the context where some much dependence exists on such a tiny number of participants. it is just a couple thousands who have to band together with these contributions to effectively make it possible that in our structure of separated powers you can block any change. this is an economy that depends on polarization. people point to polarization as the cause. it is an effect. it depends on the dysfunction, because the more dysfunctional the institution is, the easier it is to sell this opportunity to block. this function is the business model, which is what a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 115 (some duplicates have been removed)